Tag Archives: reading list

Check out @iDannyZacharias New Course on Reading for Information Extraction

There are all different types of reading: elementary, inspectional, and analytical.[1] For students, scholars, and any other person involved in academics reading leans towards information intake. This should involve a different type of reading than say reading the Lord of the Rings novels or articles on the internet. But too often, as I can attest too, reading takes a similar shape in all these venues. Or I go to the other extreme and think that I must intake, process, and note every interesting new thing that I learn from a book.

There are many articles and books on how to read better. Most of us have probably (intentional or not) developed a system of reading that suits us. We may have learned from mentors, friends, or just experience but we all have a system. If you’re like me then you probably feel that your system is flawed and that there has to be a better way.

Well enter the ever helpful Danny Zacharias. I’ve always enjoyed his tips on scholarship on his blog and his ever helpful Greek vocabularly/parsing apps.

He has developed a new and interesting course on improving your information intake when reading. Here are the goals of the course:

  • Find more time for making reading a life-long habit
  • Learn to read faster
  • Learn more from the books you read
  • Set up a system for making information more useful to you later
  • Conquer your reading list!

For this week only it is only $10 (regularly $25). You should definitely check it out. I anticipate this will be a helpful course. I will be taking it soon and will report back on how it went.


  1. Mortimer Adler in How to Read a Book  ↩

Greek Reading List

I have been trying to do more Greek reading of late and I came across this list over at the Dunelm Road blog. The list is by Daniel Wallace and was originally posted by Ben Blackwell[1] here.. The order of the list is supposed to go form easiest to hardest while being grouped in about 10 chapter increments.

Theoretically one could read the whole New Testament in a month but for my studies right now that seems a little too ambitious. I do think I will try to start with a chapter a day and increase over time.

I find it best to use the Zondervan Greek Reader for when I am just reading Greek. I find by using the reader it forces me to think through words I should know but have forgotten. For example, if you come across a word that occurs more than 30x it will not be listed in the footnotes. If I were not using a reader I would have a much quicker trigger looking up a word that I already know. I prefer this reader over UBS Greek NT Reader’s Edition for a couple reasons:

  1. No parsing. I find this to be an advantage because it forces me to work on my parsing on vocabulary I do not know. In the UBS reader it parses both difficult words and every word that occurs 30x or less.
  2. Size. The Zondervan reader is roughly over half the size of the UBS Reader, which makes it much easier to carry around from place to place.

If anyone is interested in forming a Greek reading plan with me just contact me via twitter (@renshaw330) or email (brenshaw833@gmail.com). This would mostly be for accountability purposes because it is so easy to stray from reading the original languages daily.

Here is the list:

  1. John 1–11
  2. John 12–21
  3. 1 John; 2 John; 3 John; Philemon
  4. Mark 1–8
  5. Mark 9–16
  6. Matthew 1–10
  7. Matthew 11–20
  8. Matthew 21–28
  9. Revelation 1–11
  10. Revelation 12–22
  11. 1 Thessalonians; 2 Thessalonians
  12. Ephesians; Colossians
  13. Philippians; Romans 1–8
  14. Romans 9–16
  15. 1 Corinthians 1–10
  16. 1 Corinthians 11–16
  17. Galatians; James
  18. 1 Peter; 1 Timothy
  19. 2 Timothy; Titus
  20. Jude; 2 Peter
  21. 2 Corinthians 1–7
  22. 2 Corinthians 8–13
  23. Luke 1–8
  24. Luke 9–16
  25. Luke 17–24
  26. Acts 1–10
  27. Acts 11–19
  28. Acts 20–28
  29. Hebrews 1–7
  30. Hebrews 8–13

Download the PDF of the list here.

Tavis Bohlinger has several good posts on practicing greek like a violin player. You can find his introductory post here.


  1. You can follow him on twitter at @bencblackwell  ↩