Tag Archives: Logos Bible Software

Logos Bible Software Resources for Sale

I am selling several of my resources for Logos Bible Software. I’ll keep this list updated until all have been sold. Use the form below to contact me. 

Buy $100-149 = 10% off total price
Buy $150-199 = 15% off total price
Buy $200+ = 20% off total price

Note: Logos requires the buyer to pay a $20 license transfer fee. You only pay this once, whether you buy one or all of these items.

Title Author Academic Pricing Selling
Logos 6: Silver Logos 799.99 $750
The New Testament and the People of God NT Wright 25.99 $20
Jesus and the Victory of God NT Wright 29.80 $20
Suprised by Hope NT Wright 17.85 $10
Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary 104.95 $60
Dictionary of Major Bible Interpreters IVP 34.95 $10
John MacArthur Essential Bible Study Library John MacArthur No longer available $40
Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament Greg Beale, ed 59.99 $35
BDAG/HALOT Bundle Multiple 248.95 $200
IVP Dictionary of the Old Testament Bundle (Historical Books & Pentateuch) IVP 69.95 $45
IVP Dictionary of the Old Testament Bundle (Prophets & Wisdom, Poetry, and Writings) IVP 71.95 $45
Introducing Biblical Hebrew Allen Ross 49.99 $25
Liddell and Scott Greek-English Lexicon (LSJ) Multiple 130.75 $80
Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Daniel Wallace 39.95 $15
Grammar of the Greek New Testament A.T. Robertson 59.95 $35
Intermediate New Testament Greek: A Linguistic and Exegetical Approach Richard Young 21.99 $10
Southern Baptist Journal of Theology (11 vols.) Multiple 34.95 $15
Christian Theology, 2nd ed. Millard Erickson 29.99 $5
Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Bible Doctrine Wayne Grudem 30.95 $10
New Bible Commentary D.A. Carson ed. 39.95 $15
The Drama of Scripture: Finding Our Place in the Biblical Story Craig Bartholomew 19.95 $10
The Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts? Greg Beale ed. 36.00 $10
Old Testament Theology Paul House 28.00 $10
New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ Thomas Schreiner 44.99 $20
Orthodoxy CK Chesterton 12.08 $5
Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society Multiple 104.95 $70
ESV Bible Study Notes Multiple 29.95 $10
An Introduction to the New Testament Carson and Moo 31.99 $15

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Quickly Paste Bible References Using Accordance or Logos Bible Software

Often times when you are working on a project that includes bible references you will want to actually quote the bible verse. Generally the workflow would include opening up your bible software of choice, searching for the reference, and then copying and pasting that reference into the document. There is actually a quicker way to do this through the use of services on the Mac. Services allow apps to communicate in the background and do some basic functionality from that particular app. In the two videos below I show you how to use both Accordance and Logos Bible Software’s services to quickly retreive the text of a bible reference all with a simple keyboard shortcut without leaving your word processor.

Accordance has more robust services to offer:

  1. Insert verses – this service pastes the text from your default resource
  2. Insert verses from any text – this service allows you to choose the resource that you want to paste from
  3. Search for words – allows you to highlight a word (in any app) and search for it in Accordance
  4. Search with options – same as above but you get to choose what resource(s) you search from
  5. View verses – opens up Accordance to the verse you highlighted

In order to download Accordance’s service go here.

Logos Bible Software offers two services:

  1. Copy Bible Verses – opens up Logos to the copy bible verses module. At the time of writing I think this has a bug as I can not get it to work correctly
  2. Replace with passage – pastes the bible verse of the highlighted reference

For each of these services you can add keyboard shortcuts from the System Preferences. Note: If you have trouble getting this to work in some apps such as Pages then try changing the keyboard shortcut. If there are duplicate keyboard shortcuts for two different commands then both of them will not work.

Check out two recent interviews on the Gospel of Luke

Recently I listened to two excellent podcasts on Luke. The first is on the Logos Mobile Ed podcast with Andrew Pitts. He discusses a variety of topics but I particularly enjoyed his thoughts on Luke and pseudipigraphy in the pastoral epistles. The second podcast is from the Beeson Divinity school with Timothy George. In this one he interviews Beth Kreitzer who authored the recent volume on Luke in the Reformation Commentary Series.

  • Listen to the interview with Andrew Pitts here.
  • Listen to the interview with Beth Kreitzer here.

iOS Workflow: Quickly Search BDAG Entries in Logos using Drafts

Description:

Quickly type the lexical value in Drafts to search BDAG in the Logos Bible Software iOS app (video demo)

Apps Needed:

Drafts – $9.99 (Universal)
Logos Bible Software – Free (must have BDAG)

Workflow

  1. Open Drafts
  2. Switch to Greek keyboard on iOS
  3. Type lexical value (no need for accents)
  4. Click the BDAG action button
  5. Will automatically open the Logos app to the lexical entry in BDAG. Note: I find it works best if you download the BDAG resource to your iPad/iPhone

Download the workflow here

An Interview With Steven Runge On His New Commentary On Romans (Pt. 2)

If you would like to read the whole interview in one post see here. Or if you would like to go to part 1 click here.

Purchase

Logos Bible Software just released Steve Runge’s excellent new commentary on Romans. Runge has introduced many of us into the world of discourse grammar with his first book Discourse Grammer and then a complete analysis of the New Testament. I will soon be writing a full review of the Romans commentary but in the meantime I had the privelege to conduct an interview with the man himself.

How long did you work on this Romans commentary?

The book was in process for three years, but I did not work on it consistently during that time. Other projects and the needs of my folks kept me away more than I wanted, and I also learned some important lessons about how NOT to write a longer book. ‘Nuf said.

How does discourse grammar allow you to both zoom in to understand the particulars of a passage while maintaining the overall picture of the book?

I’ve heard complaints from some that what I do isn’t really “discourse” anything because I don’t go above the sentence level. Hmm. Whatever you call my approach, identifying lower level features is not the end of the game, but just the beginning. The theoretical model I follow, based on the work on cognitive comprehension of reading by Walter Kintsch, views reading as an iterative process rather than bottom-up or top-down. So as I analyze lower-level features, these necessarily inform the next level of analysis as I move up the text. But after I have analyzed smaller units into higher-level structures, my approach demands that I corroborate my findings by reconciling them with the lower-level features. This lead to the the kind of conundrum presented by bibles making a major break at Romans 8:1.

The problem? All the linguistic markers point to the major break being at 7:25b with ἄρα οὖν. This data forced me to rethink the relationship between 7:14 ff. and Romans 8. So although I may not be doing what some think discourse analysis demands, I never claimed that I was doing that. But I am certainly moving in that direction, as the HDC Romans volume will demonstrate. Discourse grammar was a necessary precursor to master lower-level features, setting the stage to move from discourse grammar to discourse analysis. Look for more on the latter in 2015.

One of the more controversial passages in Romans is 7:14–25. The major question is whether Paul is speaking of his pre-Christian self or himself as a Christian. How specifically does discourse grammar shed light on your interpretation?

The conundrum I hit at viewing 7:25b as the beginning of the talk about the Spirit necessarily impacted my reading of 7:14–25. I’m not going to spoil it, but I believe we have been asking the wrong questions about this passage, especially if it is without carefully considering the connection to 8. Paul has dealt with the penalty of sin, but not with the ongoing problem of sin in the flesh that we all face until our bodies are finally redeemed (8:23). Paul is well aware that we will need to contend with sin until either our death or Christ’s return. 7:14–25 describes the universal struggle all of us contend with until the final redemption. The devil is our adversary, but the desires of our flesh are an even more present one, as he makes clear. The solution to these two laws that he sees at work in us (7:25)? No longer living enslaved to the flesh, but with our mind set on the Spirit so as to put to death the deeds of the flesh (Rom 8). That’s it in a detail-less nutshell, but there are all kinds of thematically-loaded references in these chapters that clarify Paul’s intentions. I don’t think Paul is talking about either his pre-Christian experience or is present struggle, but rather the universal struggle that we all face in this present fallen flesh until we are fully redeemed.

Just a quick note from Brian: These are actual images from the commentary. One of the great aspects of these are they they are easy to save and implement into powerpoints for teaching or preaching. Also, Logos provides blank templates with the corresponding background so you can also add your own slides as well. Personally, I think the images throughout the commentary add both another way of examining the passage but also to be able to understand the concepts better.

How does one enter the world of studying discourse grammar?

I have a blog post on that very topic at my site that covers that very topic, as it is one of the most frequently-asked questions I receive. You’ll also find a lot of introductory materials to work through including a free sample of the Discourse Grammar. I blogged my way through the chapters as I wrote in order to test out my explanations. Most all of my conference papers and articles are posted on the Publications page.

If you want to see what the practical payoff is for applying discourse grammar to exegesis, both the Romans and Philippians High Definition Commentaries are on sale through Oct. 28. Just use the coupon code HighDefCom at checkout for 15% off.

Thanks Dr. Runge for taking part in this interview!

Other information about the Romans commentary:

//fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/bbntya4j84

From Logos:

Organized into preachable portions of Scripture and featuring over 100 custom graphics, Romans is perfect for sermons, Bible studies, and small groups. Using principles of linguistics and Biblical exegesis, Dr. Runge illuminates the key principles and overall message of the book of Romans. This commentary not only helps you identify the big ideas of a passage, it gives you custom slides that you can export right into sermons and Bible studies. Dr. Runge provides applicable and approachable examples throughout, making clear every-day connections between ideas in Romans and practical living. The High Definition Commentary: Romans is a one-of-a-kind Bible teaching tool, and only available from Lexham Press.

Check out Dr. Runge’s excellent blog related to all things discourse grammar at NT Discourse.

An interview with Steven Runge on his new commentary on Romans (Pt. 1)

Purchase

Logos Bible Software just released Steve Runge’s excellent new commentary on Romans. Runge has introduced many of us into the world of discourse grammar with his first book Discourse Grammer and then a complete analysis of the New Testament. I will soon be writing a full review of the Romans commentary but in the meantime I had the privelege to conduct an interview with the man himself. This is a two part interview so be sure to look for part two coming out next week!

Dr. Runge, tell us a little bit about your journey to scholarship and specifically discourse grammar.

I started seminary a few years after coming to faith in Christ, wanting to learn how to study and teach the Bible more effectively. I had some excellent language and exegesis profs, but saw that languages were in a steady state of decline. Despite all the talk about how important languages were, few scholars I met could offer a very compelling case for the practical payoff for the average pastor. A two month mission trip to Ethiopia in 1993 really solidified what turned into “a holy discontent” like Bill Hybels describes. Frankly, it just pissed me off to see the decline, so I made it may mission in life to do practical things that demonstrated the practical payoff of language study for ministry. My inner framing contractor overshadowed my inner scholar.

What led to the idea of your grammar, the Lexham Discourse Bibles, and now the High Definition commentaries?

When I first began reading my way into linguistic approaches to biblical languages, it was terribly difficult. I felt like I was looking into this wonderful convention center full of amazing things, but all the doors were locked. Part of my discontent consequently focused on making it easier for others to come behind. The Lexham Discourse Greek and Hebrew bibles stemmed from my experience teaching. I found it terribly difficult to train students to master that level of analysis, yet even introductory students could interact meaningfully with a marked-up text. Stephen Levinsohn had come to the same conclusion in his work training Bible translators. So when I pitched the idea to Logos, they agreed to fund me for two years, and Levinsohn agreed to consult. Once the GNT project was completed, I felt something like Doctor McCoy in the “Star Trek: the Search for Spock.” I had the grammar in my head as a result of analyzing the entire Greek New Testament. I desperately wanted to get it out and on paper while it was fresh. I was given 100 calendar days by Logos to write the book, and I hit the deadline with a draft by Labor Day 2008.


Runge Books

The High Definition commentaries stemmed from a personal challenge from Bob Pritchett, CEO of Faithlife/Logos Bible Software. He said if discourse studies is so useful, then prove it: write a commentary that offers a rigorous analysis of the text, but that doesn’t require any background in Greek. Oh, and include graphics to help pastors and their congregation better conceptualize the text.[1] He sketched these ideas on a napkin and then left my office. I came back a month later with some ideas, we thrashed on them, then put it up for Logos customers to pre-order.[2] We ended up getting all the orders we needed to fund the project in about 8 hours. The Philippians volume was well received, so I decided to tackle on of the hardest ones next: Romans. It really turned out to be hard, and family crises added to the length of the production process.

See all Runge’s work at Logos here.

Some people may be thinking do we really need another commentary on Romans? What makes your commentary unique to the field and what benefit is it to both pastors and scholars?

The primary goal of this commentary is to help you trace the flow of the writer’s argument, and to understand the various devices he used to pull this off. You will not find much if any discussion about backgrounds, authorship, or theology, as there are great resources available already. What I felt was missing was a text-based commentary that didn’t get bogged down in the detail, but could walk you through a tour of the text so that you could go and do the same for others. Whether I succeed or not is something different, but this was my goal.

You can purchase the commentary here.

Thanks Dr. Runge for taking part in this interview. We look forward to the second half next week!

In the meantime here is some information regarding the Romans commentary.

//fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/bbntya4j84

From Logos:

Organized into preachable portions of Scripture and featuring over 100 custom graphics, Romans is perfect for sermons, Bible studies, and small groups. Using principles of linguistics and Biblical exegesis, Dr. Runge illuminates the key principles and overall message of the book of Romans. This commentary not only helps you identify the big ideas of a passage, it gives you custom slides that you can export right into sermons and Bible studies. Dr. Runge provides applicable and approachable examples throughout, making clear every-day connections between ideas in Romans and practical living. The High Definition Commentary: Romans is a one-of-a-kind Bible teaching tool, and only available from Lexham Press.

Dr. Runge also has an excellent blog related to all things discourse grammar at NT Discourse.


  1. In way of a preview to my review the graphics are one of the best features of the commentary. They both help explain the concepts but also provide resources for pastors and teachers to use when explaining the text.  ↩

  2. Speaking of pre-order, the High Definiton Commentary on James is available for pre-order now!  ↩

Vocabulary Helps (Greek, Latin, and Hebrew)

Over the years I have compiled a number of vocabulary cards on Quizlet. I am currently trying to memorize all Greek words in the GNT down to 10x. I was thankful to realize that I had already made vocabulary cards using Trenchard’s The Complete Vocabulary Guide to the Greek New Testament. I thought I would highlight some of the sets I have created and some other useful apps to assist in vocabulary memorization. Personally, I use Quizlet to create the flashcards and then sync it with Flashcards Deluxe, which I have found to be the best flashcard app out there.

My Quizlet Sets

  • Vocabulary from 50 to 10 times in the GNT using Trenchard. I tried breaking down each category so there are no more than roughly 40 words in each set. Link
  • All Patristic Latin vocabulary words taking from John Collins’s Ecclesiastical Latin GrammarThese are broken down for each unit. Link
  • All Hebrew vocabulary words taken from Allen Ross’s Introducing Biblical Hebrew and Grammar. Note, due to the nature of the class I took the first half of the vocal is taken from the 1st edition. Link
  • Vocabulary in the book of James occurring 32 times or less. There are three different groupings: 1) the whole book of James 2) by chapter 3) by paragraph. Also see this blog post. Link

FlashGreek

Danny Zacharias has created a wonderful app (and others!) for memorizing vocabulary called FlashGreek

Old Testament Hebrew Vocabulary Cards

This nice little app covers a number of grammars such as 

  •  Basics of Biblical Hebrew, by Gary D. Pratico & Miles V. Van Pelt
  •  Introducing Biblical Hebrew, Allen P. Ross
  •  Beginning Biblical Hebrew, Mark David Futato
  •  A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew, Duane A. Garrett and Jason S. DeRouchie
  •  A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew, C. L. Seow
  •  Invitation to Biblical Hebrew, Russell Fuller and Kyoungwon Choi

Purchase

Logos Bible Software

Cliff Kvidahl highlights how you can use an app from Logos Bible Software to create vocabulary cards.

Logos Free Book of the Month: Spirituality of the Psalms by Walter Brueggemann

The free book of the month from Logos looks like a good one. I was encouraged after reading a couple paragraphs of the first chapter. In our community group we are going through some of the Psalms so I will be reading through some of this as we discuss throughout the summer. Check out the opening paragraphs and be encouraged.

The Book of Psalms provides the most reliable theological, pastoral, and liturgical resource given us in the biblical tradition. In season and out of season, generation after generation, faithful women and men turn to the Psalms as a most helpful resource for conversation with God about things that matter most. The Psalms are helpful because they are a genuinely dialogical literature that expresses both sides of the conversation of faith. On the one hand, Israel’s faithful speech addressed to God is the substance of the Psalms. The Psalms do this so fully and so well because they articulate the entire gamut of Israel’s speech to God, from profound praise to the utterance of unspeakable anger and doubt. On the other hand, as Martin Luther understood so passionately, the Psalms are not only addressed to God. They are a voice of the gospel, God’s good word addressed to God’s faithful people. In this literature the community of faith has heard and continues to hear the sovereign speech of God, who meets the community in its depths of need and in its heights of celebration. The Psalms draw our entire life under the rule of God, where everything may be submitted to the God of the gospel.

Psalm interpretation is at the present time beset by a curious reality. There is a devotional tradition of piety that finds the Psalms acutely attuned to the needs and possibilities of profound faith. (To be sure, some of that devotional literature is less than profound.) This tradition of Psalm usage tends to be precritical, and is relatively uncomplicated by any scholarly claims. There is also a well-established scholarly tradition of interpretation with a rather stable consensus. This tradition of interpretation tends to be critical, working beyond the naïveté of the devotional tradition, but sometimes being more erudite than insightful. These two traditions of interpretation proceed without much knowledge of, attention to, or impact on the other. The devotional tradition of piety is surely weakened by disregarding the perspectives and insights of scholarship. Conversely, the scholarly tradition of interpretation is frequently arid, because it lingers excessively on formal questions, with inability or reluctance to bring its insights and methods to substantive matters of exposition. This cleavage, of course, must not be overstated, for there are some contacts and overlaps among interpreters, but that contact is limited, modest, and too restrained.

What seems to be needed (and is here attempted) is a postcritical interpretation that lets the devotional and scholarly traditions support, inform, and correct each other, so that the formal gains of scholarly methods may enhance and strengthen, as well as criticize, the substance of genuine piety in its handling of the Psalms.

Brueggemann, Walter. Spirituality of the Psalms. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2002.

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Reading the Themelios Journal in Logos Bible Software

Logos Bible Software is always finding great ways to add value to their product. Whether it be the bible sense lexicon, mobile-ed program, or the timeline feature they are always finding new and innovative ways to improve their software.

They are also finding ways to get free quality resources into the hands of their users. Logos started this program in 2013 but I was reminded about it when the latest issue of Themelios came out this week, They have teamed up with The Gospel Coalition and Themelios to make new issues available for free in Logos.

This is great. Instead of having a collection of free PDFs you can now integrate the journal into your library. This means the journal is completely searchable and linked to your other resources. Getting the journal into Logos is quick and easy. 

Go to the Themelios homepage and click on the Logos icon. Then go through the checkout at Logos and the journal will be added to your account.

 

You can also download the issues from 2013 here.

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Evernote for Academics: Day 05 – School

Thanks for coming back for the fifth post in the Evernote for Academics. Today I am going to discuss some of the ways that you can use Evernote in school. In the next post I will address using the program for research papers/projects. Since both of these use cases are very similar I will try to address different aspects in each post.

Evernote can really be a one-stop shop for school. I find the following three aspects of Evernote most useful for school:

  1. Availability/sync on any device
  2. Ability to deal with multiple file formats in one note
  3. Keyboard shortcuts

Availability/sync on any device

If you are at all familiar with Evernote you know that this is one of its greatest strengths. Their slogan “remember everything” is made possible because you can have Evernote wherever you are at. The ability to have all your school files and projects in one central location is very handy when in school.

At the beginning of the semester add all your files for each class in separate notebooks (including syllabus, handouts, misc files, etc). This way all your files are in one central location and searchable.

Ability to deal with multiple file formats in one note

Evernote can handle virtually any type of file that you throw at it. This is great, especially when taking notes in class. You can have audio, links, pdfs, images, and much more in one note. Let’s examine how this can be helpful in class:

Audio in the classroom

Evernote has the ability to record audio within the app. This will allow you to record the lecture and have it coincide with your notes. Personally, if I am recording a lecture I will stop when the professor changes topics. This way I can have short audio snippets aligned with my notes. This way when I am reviewing for an exam I can listen to the audio and not waste time by finding the exact point of the lecture in a 60 minute audio clip.

Images in the classroom

I find two helpful use cases of using images within notes. If the professor is using a projector but doesn’t give access to the slides if there is an important slide with a chart, graph or image you can quickly take out your phone and take a picture and include it in your notes.

Another helpful use case is when the professor is referencing one of your textbooks you can quickly take a picture in the Evernote app of that specific text and import it within your note. When you are studying later you can just look at your notes instead of fishing through the textbook to try to find that exact location.

Links

Often times the professor will give out website, book, or article recommendations. Using Evernote you can quickly create a clickable link of that resource right within your note for quick access later.

Due to a limitation in Evernote the following tip only works in conjunction with a text editor called Byword. It allows you to write with a distraction free screen in Markdown. I mentioned this in a previous post but Markdown is a language similar to HTML but is much simpler and designed to be readable. I write most of my text in this language and then export it to Evernote. The reason is two-fold: 1) I prefer to write in an app like Byword because it just presents a blank screen that is less distracting 2) Writing in Markdown allows me to focus on the text but not the formatting. Using an app like Byword you can still use your normal keyboard shortcuts for basic formatting (i.e. Command+B for bold text) and not have to remember the syntax. Click here for overview of the basic Markdown syntax. See this video for a quick introduction to Markdown.

I also find it helpful to link certain names and topics to an encyclopedia or dictionary article in Logos. Logos has the ability to create URLs that take you directly to a certain location in a resource. In my church history course when a name, event, or location was mentioned that I was unfamiliar with I would look it up in Logos and create a hyperlink to that resource for later. See video below on how to create a Logos link.

Handouts/PDFs

If a professor provides handouts of a topic you can quickly add that to you note. You can do this a couple different ways. First, you can include the PDF inline with your notes. Depending on the length of the PDF and how you have Evernote set up this could be useful. This works best if you have the option to view PDFs and other documents as attachments, which you can change in the settings. Personally, I prefer to have the PDFs appear inline, which just means that you can read it right there on the screen when you open the note and not click on the attachment. In this scenario I actually create a new note with the PDF and create a hyperlink to that note (similar to the Logos URL above). In order to create a hyperlink in a note you can use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Opt+Command+C (Mac) or on Windows and Mac right-click the not and click Copy Note Link.

If you receive paper handouts you can quickly take a picture using the document camera in the Evernote app on your mobile device and sync it with your notes.

Keyboard Shortcuts

By knowing the Evernote keyboard shorts it will save you a lot of time when formatting your document on the fly in the classroom. Below are some the keyboard shortcuts for Evernote. I highlighted some of my most used shortcuts that you may find useful (click to expand).

For a complete list of keyboard shortcuts see below:

Quick Tips

  • Use individual notebooks for each class and create an Evernote stack for the semester
  • Use simple tags to stay organized (notes, homework, syllabus, etc.).
  • Use the to-do feature to plan your week and projects. Make sure to hyperlink to specific notes for quick reference later.
  • To get the most out of the semester be sure to put all your files and notes in Evernote for easy searching and so nothing gets lost. 

Adding Links to Logos Resources in Evernote

Links to the Evernote for Academics Series

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Create Your Own Actions in Launch Center Pro for Logos on iOS

In a previous post I showed you how to integrate Launch Center Pro and Logos for iOS using pre-made actions that I had already created. What if you wanted to create your own actions for different resources? Thankfully, by using Logos’ hyperlinking feature it is quite easy to do so. Watch the short video below as I show you how to create your own actions and increase your productivity on your iOS device.

 

Follow a link below to watch the video

(Web)(Mobile/Tablet)

or view on YouTube

Launch Center Pro is $4.99 (iPhone)(iPad) in the App Store and is available for the iPhone and iPad.

Be More Productive on Logos for iOS with Launch Center Pro

One of the things I love figuring out is how to become more efficient on my iOS devices. One app that helps me do this is Launch Center Pro. It allows you to easily start in one location and perform actions in other apps quickly.

I recently figured out how to link this app with the Logos Bible Software iOS app by using x-callback-urls.

This allows me to start in Launch Center Pro and search for a Bible reference in whatever version I want (NIV, ESV, NA27, LXX, etc.). Another use for this is to look up Greek and Hebrew terms quickly in lexicons such as BDAG, LSJ, HALOT, and BDB. I can also look up dictionary articles in the IVP Dictionaries (Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, Paul and His Letters, etc). Finally, I can quickly open up a variety of Greek and Hebrew grammars that I have installed in Logos.

I created a short screencast showing how this can be accomplished. At the end of the video I explain how you can easily install the actions onto your iOS device. Update: If you want to create your own actions and not use the pre-made actions see this post

Update: I recommended downloading the resources that you want to link to on your iOS device. I have noticed hit and miss results when a resource is being pulled from the cloud on the Logos app.

Follow a link below to watch the video

(Web)(Mobile/Tablet)

or view on YouTube

Launch Center Pro is $4.99 in the App Store and is available for the iPhone and iPad.

FYI: In order to install the actions click on “Logos” at the bottom of my page on your iOS device. From there you can click the link and it will open up Launch Center Pro to install.